新經濟學範式告別曼昆?

yinung: 終於有新式經濟學教科書問世了… 用三個觀點重新描述「數據時代」的經濟學。

原文網址:https://kknews.cc/finance/nnxg8.html

…有一本全新的《經濟學》面世,曼昆《經濟學原理》突然面臨強有力的挑戰。這就是阿西莫格魯、萊布森與李斯特合著的《經濟學》。這三人都是當下紅得發紫的經濟學家,也都已在多個領域做出突出貢獻,被認為是未來數年諾貝爾經濟學獎理所當然的候選人…

三人版《經濟學》比曼昆的《經濟學原理》還薄了許多。仔細一讀,《經濟學》確實增添了大量三人自身的研究成果,但同時也刪減了大量經典內容。也就是說,三人都認為那些內容不再是探索未來經濟學所必須掌握的知識。刪去教科書里的經典內容,比補充內容需要更多的勇氣。

他們三人沒有拋出曼昆式的「十大原理」,但也開宗明義地提出了「三個渾然一體的主題」,分別是優化(optimization)、均衡(equilibrium)和經驗主義(empiricism)

 

 

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弗農·史密斯 (Vernon L. Smith)

Vernon L. Smith (弗農·史密斯)

引自:維基百科

弗農·洛馬克斯·史密斯Vernon Lomax Smith,1927年1月1日-,加利福尼亞查普曼大學法學院和商學院教授喬治·梅森大學多學科研究中心經濟學研究學者、莫卡托斯中心成員、亞利桑那大學教授、查普曼大學 (Chapman University) 教授。

他是2002年諾貝爾經濟學獎獲得者,獲獎原因是「開創了一系列實驗法,為通過實驗室實驗進行可靠的經濟學研究確定了標準」。大學在加州理工學院主修電子物理,於1952獲堪薩斯大學經濟學碩士,1955年得哈佛大學經濟博士。

Vernon Lomax Smith (born January 1, 1927) is professor of economics at Chapman University’s Argyros School of Business and Economics and School of Law in Orange, California, a research scholar at George Mason University Interdisciplinary Center for Economic Science, and a Fellow of the Mercatus Center, all in Arlington, Virginia. Smith shared the 2002 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences with Daniel Kahneman. He is the founder and president of the International Foundation for Research in Experimental Economics and a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute in Washington D.C.. In 2004 Smith was honored with an honorary doctoral degree[1] at Universidad Francisco Marroquín, the institution that named the Vernon Smith Center for Experimental Economics Research after him.[2]

諾貝爾得獎講稿: Constructivist and Ecological Rationality in Economics (PDF)

Steven D Levitt (史帝芬‧雷維)

*引自 Wikipedia

Steven D Levitt (史帝芬‧雷維) (born May 29, 1967) is an American economist known for his work in the field of crime, in particular on the link between legalized abortion and crime rates. Winner of the 2004 John Bates Clark Medal, he is currently the William B. Ogden Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago, director of the Becker Center on Chicago Price Theory at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. He was co-editor of the Journal of Political Economy published by the University of Chicago Press until December 2007. He co-authored the best-selling book Freakonomics (2005) and its sequel Superfreakonomics (2009). He is a grand-nephew of Robert L. May, the lyricist of Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. In 2009, Levitt co-founded The Greatest Good, a business and philanthropy consulting company. He was chosen as one of Time magazine’s “100 People Who Shape Our World" in 2006.[1]

 

John List (約翰‧李斯特)

*以下引自 Wikipedia

John Emil List (約翰‧李斯特) (born September 25, 1968) is The Homer J. Livingston Professor in Economics at the University of Chicago. He received his B.S. from the University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point, and his Ph.D. from the University of Wyoming in 1996. List had his first teaching position at the University of Central Florida, and he then moved to the University of Arizona and the University of Maryland, College Park, where he still holds an adjunct position, before moving to Chicago. List also spends time at Tilburg University, where he is a distinguished visiting scholar and Resources for the Future, where he is a University Distinguished Scholar. From May 2002 to July 2003 he served as Senior Economist, President’s Council of Economic Advisors for Environmental and Resource Economics, where he worked on multi-national market institutions to address climate change, the Clear Skies Act, the OMB benefit cost guidelines, and the Canada–United States softwood lumber dispute.

Within academia, List is known particularly for his innovative use of field experiments in economics, a research approach that List links to Swedish Economist Peter Bohm. For his work using field experiments, List was included as one of the Top 7 economists in the world according to a 2010 Forbes publication.[citation needed]. In 2012, List was selected to receive the Yrjo Jahnsson Lecture Series prize, given by the Yrjö Jahnsson Foundation. The award, given every 2 years by the Finnish Foundation, recognized List’s achievements to society from pioneering the use of field experiments. Ten of the previous Nineteen recipients have gone on to win the Nobel Prize in economics.

List uses field experiments to offer new insights in various areas of economics research, such as education, private provision of public goods, social preferences, prospect theory, environmental economics, marketplace effects on corporate and government policy decisions, and multi-unit auctions. Some of his more recent field experimental work in the area of education was discussed in Bloomberg Magazine.[1] In the article, Nobel Laureate Gary Becker tabs List as a strong candidate for a future Nobel Prize for his work on field experiments. His work on charitable fundraising was highlighted in New York Times Magazine on March 9, 2008.,[2] where List is credited as being an early pioneer of field experiments. In a recent Crain’s Chicago Business article, List is referred to as a “rock star" in the area of philanthropy.[3] Many of these seminal studies were produced while List was a faculty member at the University of Maryland, College Park and the University of Arizona.

List has received numerous awards. In 2004, List received the 1st Place Competitive Paper Award for his field experiment titled “Informational Cascades: Evidence from a Field Experiment with Market Professionals.” The paper was picked as the top research study in 2004 within finance by the FMA, which considered hundreds of studies. List received the prestigious 2008 Arrow Senior Prize for his field experimental work in the area of testing economic theory from the BE Press. In July 2010, List was awarded the highest honor by the AAEA, the John Kenneth Galbraith prize. The award was given for recognition of List’s “breakthrough discoveries in economics and outstanding contributions to humanity through leadership, research, and service. In particular, List’s pathbreaking work using field experiments in economics." Finally, List was selected to deliver the Yrjo Jahnsson Lecture in October of 2012.

Marginal Revolution, a blog written by economist and author Tyler Cowen calls List “one of the most important young economists".[2] Greg Mankiw also tabs List as a top mind on his blog.[citation needed] The University of Chicago economist and author of Freakonomics, Steven Levitt, has referred to List as the young economist most likely to win a Nobel Prize in Economics. It has also been heavily speculated that List was the Clark medal runner-up in 2007.[3] In 2011 List was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[4]

List’s research on behavioral economics has focused on testing theories like gift exchange, social preferences, and prospect theory. Traditional tests of these theories relied on recruiting undergraduate students to participate in experiments for a small amount of money. List instead recruited subjects in actual marketplaces to participate in experiments, sometimes unbeknownst to even the subjects.[6] List’s field experiments have found that gift exchange is not as powerful a motivator of labor effort as earlier research found,[7] that social preferences are not as pronounced as prior research found,[8] and that the divergence between Willingness to Pay and Willingness to Accept often called the endowment effect, predicted by prospect theory, disappears with market experience.[9]

List’s recent work in behavioral economics has found that framing can induce increased worker productivity.,[10] and has been picked up by several corporations around the world.

born September 25, 1968) is The Homer J. Livingston Professor in Economics at the University of Chicago. He received his B.S. from the University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point, and his Ph.D. from the University of Wyoming in 1996. List had his first teaching position at the University of Central Florida, and he then moved to the University of Arizona and the University of Maryland, College Park, where he still holds an adjunct position, before moving to Chicago. List also spends time at Tilburg University, where he is a distinguished visiting scholar and Resources for the Future, where he is a University Distinguished Scholar. From May 2002 to July 2003 he served as Senior Economist, President’s Council of Economic Advisors for Environmental and Resource Economics, where he worked on multi-national market institutions to address climate change, the Clear Skies Act, the OMB benefit cost guidelines, and the Canada–United States softwood lumber dispute.

Within academia, List is known particularly for his innovative use of field experiments in economics, a research approach that List links to Swedish Economist Peter Bohm. For his work using field experiments, List was included as one of the Top 7 economists in the world according to a 2010 Forbes publication.[citation needed]. In 2012, List was selected to receive the Yrjo Jahnsson Lecture Series prize, given by the Yrjö Jahnsson Foundation. The award, given every 2 years by the Finnish Foundation, recognized List’s achievements to society from pioneering the use of field experiments. Ten of the previous Nineteen recipients have gone on to win the Nobel Prize in economics.

List uses field experiments to offer new insights in various areas of economics research, such as education, private provision of public goods, social preferences, prospect theory, environmental economics, marketplace effects on corporate and government policy decisions, and multi-unit auctions. Some of his more recent field experimental work in the area of education was discussed in Bloomberg Magazine.[1] In the article, Nobel Laureate Gary Becker tabs List as a strong candidate for a future Nobel Prize for his work on field experiments. His work on charitable fundraising was highlighted in New York Times Magazine on March 9, 2008.,[2] where List is credited as being an early pioneer of field experiments. In a recent Crain’s Chicago Business article, List is referred to as a “rock star" in the area of philanthropy.[3] Many of these seminal studies were produced while List was a faculty member at the University of Maryland, College Park and the University of Arizona.

List has received numerous awards. In 2004, List received the 1st Place Competitive Paper Award for his field experiment titled “Informational Cascades: Evidence from a Field Experiment with Market Professionals.” The paper was picked as the top research study in 2004 within finance by the FMA, which considered hundreds of studies. List received the prestigious 2008 Arrow Senior Prize for his field experimental work in the area of testing economic theory from the BE Press. In July 2010, List was awarded the highest honor by the AAEA, the John Kenneth Galbraith prize. The award was given for recognition of List’s “breakthrough discoveries in economics and outstanding contributions to humanity through leadership, research, and service. In particular, List’s pathbreaking work using field experiments in economics." Finally, List was selected to deliver the Yrjo Jahnsson Lecture in October of 2012.

Marginal Revolution, a blog written by economist and author Tyler Cowen calls List “one of the most important young economists".[2] Greg Mankiw also tabs List as a top mind on his blog.[citation needed] The University of Chicago economist and author of Freakonomics, Steven Levitt, has referred to List as the young economist most likely to win a Nobel Prize in Economics. It has also been heavily speculated that List was the Clark medal runner-up in 2007.[3] In 2011 List was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[4]

 

Colin Camerer (柯林‧康莫若)

*引自 Wikipedia

Colin F. Camerer (born December 4, 1959) is an American behavioral economist and a Robert Kirby Professor of Behavioral Finance and Economics at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

A former child prodigy, Camerer received a B.A. in quantitative studies from Johns Hopkins University in 1977 (at age 17), followed by an M.B.A. in finance from the University of Chicago in 1979 and a Ph.D. in behavioral decision theory from that same institution in 1981 (at age 21). Camerer worked at Kellogg, Wharton, and the University of Chicago Booth school of business before moving to Caltech in 1994.

Camerer’s research is on the interface between cognitive psychology and economics. This work seeks a better understanding of the psychological and neurobiological basis of decision-making in order to determine the validity of models of human economic behavior. His research uses mostly economics experiments– and occasionally field studies– to understand how people behave when making decisions (e.g., risky gambles for money), in games, and in markets (e.g., speculative price bubbles).

He spoke at the Econometric Society World Congress in London on August 20, 2005 and at the Nobel Centennial Symposium in 2001 on Behavioral and Experimental Economics.

He is the author of “Behavioral Game Theory" published by Princeton University Press in 2003. [PDF]

Alvin E. Roth (艾文‧羅斯)

實驗經濟學的大師級人物: 艾文‧羅斯

艾文‧羅斯 (Alvin E. Roth) 是美國哈佛大學經濟系教授

史丹佛大學博士。著作等身,並編有 Handbook of Experimental Economics (1995), Princeton University Press. 研究專長為賽局理論、實驗經濟、和市場機制設計 (market design)。

近年主要教授課程:

Spring 2012 course in Experimental Economics (Ec 2040/HBS 4160)

Fall 2011 Market Design course (supplemented by a Market Design Blog)